Toxicology and Pathology of Citrinin

  • Christine Hanika
  • William W. Carlton
Part of the Biodeterioration Research book series (BIOR, volume 4)

Abstract

Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of filamentous fungi or molds that may colonize crops in the field or feeds or foodstuffs during storage. Production of mycotoxins is influenced by a variety of environmental factors, and different strains of fungi are capable of producing different, and often multiple toxins (Pier, 1981). Some toxic effects of fungi have been recognized in man and animals for centuries, while investigations continue on other suspected or potential effects (Butler, 1984; Pier, 1981). Factors influencing the occurrence of mycotoxicoses are complex, including interactions among multiple contaminating fungi, multiple opportunities at which contamination of foods or feeds may occur, environmental factors, plant genetic factors, influence of agricultural biocides on toxin formation, and synergistic action of multiple toxins (Moss, 1984).

Keywords

Broiler Chicken Distal Convoluted Tubule Proximal Convoluted Tubule Broiler Chick Nuclear Pyknosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christine Hanika
    • 1
  • William W. Carlton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, School of Veterinary MedicinePurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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