Social Influences on Development

An Overview
  • Michael Lewis
Part of the Genesis of Behavior book series (GOBE, volume 4)

Abstract

Historically, consideration of dyadic influences on children’s development grows out of two distinct and fundamentally different models. The first is biological in nature and the second is educational. Both models have in common the strong belief that children’s development, social as well as cognitive, is influenced primarily by dyadic interaction.

Keywords

Social Influence Attachment Relationship Dyadic Interaction Parental Competence Social Class Difference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Lewis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsRutgers Medical School—University of Medicine and Dentistry of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA

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