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Behavioral Interventions in Pediatric Neurology

  • Bruce L. Bird

Abstract

Pediatric neurology encompasses a broad continuum of disorders with great diversity of prevalences, etiologies, symptom categories, and severities. For example, the prevalence of neurological learning disabilities is estimated to be as high as 5% of the population (Tarnopol, 1971). Rare disorders such as dystonia musculorum deformans, a genetic degenerative disease, afflict a very small subset of the population but produce extreme physical incapacity (Eldridge & Fahn, 1976). Etiologies of neurological disorders include trauma, genetic, metabolic, or developmental disorders, diseases specific to the nervous system (NS) or central nervous system (CNS), or diseases which produce byproducts which in turn damage the NS or CNS. Symptom categories include all brain and NS functions, selectively or in combination. Severities range from mild aberrations in selective functions (i.e., written letter perception) to complete physical incapacity, coma, and death (Ford, 1973).

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Behavioral Treatment Apply Behavior Analysis Pediatric Neurology Biofeedback Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce L. Bird
    • 1
  1. 1.Associated Catholic Charities of New OrleansUniversity of New OrleansNew OrleansUSA

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