General Principles of Behavior Management

  • Laura Schreibman
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Few individuals responsible for the care and/or treatment of children with autism would dispute the fact that these children present one of the toughest challenges we have faced. Everyone is challenged: the family, the schools, treatment specialists, and the entire community. Over the years since autism was first described by Leo Kanner (1943), a number of treatment approaches have been proposed and implemented, only to lead to limited and/or disappointing results. However, treatment from a behavioral perspective, that is, treatment based upon the principles of learning, has proven to have particular promise as a means of helping this severely handicapped population.

Keywords

Disruptive Behavior Autistic Child Behavior Management Aversive Stimulus Apply Behavior Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura Schreibman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of California at San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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