Functional Appraisal and Therapy for Communication Disorders of Traumatically Brain-Injured Persons

  • Louise Kent-Udolf
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Functional communication means the ability to participate effectively in the everyday give-and-take of communicating with family and friends, colleagues at work, and outright strangers. It implies a degree of reciprocal enjoyment and good humor as well as the ability to negotiate meaning through communicative exchanges.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Functional Communication Hearing Disorder Aphasic Patient Language Pathology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alajouanine, T. & Lhermitte, F. Acquired aphasia in children. Brain, 1965, 88, 653–662.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Balick, S., Greene, G., Kaplan, J., Press, D., & Demopoulos, J. T. The problem-oriented medical record applied to communication disorders. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 1978, 59, 288–289.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Bedwinek, A. P. The use of PACE to facilitate gestural and verbal communication in a language-impaired child. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 1983, 14, 1–6.Google Scholar
  4. Berlin, C. I. On: Melodic intonation therapy for aphasia by R. W. Sparks and A. L. Holland. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1976, 41, 298–300.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Berman, M., & Peele, L. Self-generated cues: A method for aiding aphasic and apractic patients. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1967, 32, 372–376.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Beukelman, D. R., & Yorkston, K. A communication system. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1977, 42, 265–270.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Boiler, F., & Marrie, P. Possible role of abnormal auditory feedback in conduction aphasia. Neuropsychologia, 1978, 16, 521–524.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Borkowski, J. G., Benton, A. L., & Spreen, O. Word fluency and brain damage. Neuropsychologia, 1967 5, 135–140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Bouchard, M. M. & Shane, H. C. Use of the problem-oriented medical record in thee speech and hearing profession. American Speech and Hearing Association Journal, 1977, 19, 157–159.Google Scholar
  10. Brookshire, R. H. An introduction to aphasia. Minneapolis: BRK Publishers, 1978.Google Scholar
  11. Brookshire, R. H., Nicholas, L. S., Krueger, K. M., & Redmond, K. J. The clinical interaction analysis system: A system for observational recording of aphasia treatment. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1978, 43, 437–447.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Chédru, F., & Geschwind, N. Disorders of higher cortical functions in acute confusional states. Cortex, 1972, 8, 395–411.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Critchley, M. Aphasiology and other aspects of language. London: Edward Arnold, 1970.Google Scholar
  14. Darley, F. L. Diagnosis and appraisal of communication disorders. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1964.Google Scholar
  15. Darley, F. L. A retrospective view: Aphasia. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1977, 42, 161–169.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Darley, F. L. (Ed.) Evaluation of appraisal techniques in speech and language pathology. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1979.Google Scholar
  17. Darley, F. L., Aronson, A. E., & Brown, J. R. Motor speech disorders. Philadelphia: Saunders, 1975.Google Scholar
  18. Deal, J. L., & Florance, C. L. Modification of the eight-step continuum for treatment of apraxia of speech in adults. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1978, 42, 89–95.Google Scholar
  19. DeRenzi, E., & Fablioni, P. Normative data and screening power of a shortened version of the token test. Cortex, 1978, 14, 41–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. DeRenzi, E., & Vignolo, L. A. The token test: A sensitive test to detect receptive disturbances in aphasia. Brain, 1962, 85, 665–678.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. McNeil, M. R., and Prescott, T. E. Revised token test. Baltimore: University Park Press, 1978.Google Scholar
  22. Wertz, R. T. The token test (TT). In F. L. Darley (Ed.) Evaluation of appraisal techniques in speech and language pathology. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1979.Google Scholar
  23. Dinsdale, S. M., Mossman, P. L., Gullickson, G., Jr., & Anderson T. P. The problem-oriented medical record in rehabilitation. Archives of Physical and Medical Rehabilitation, 1970, 51, 488–492.Google Scholar
  24. Dinsdale, S. M., Gent, M., Kline, G., & Milner, R. Problem oriented medical records: Their impact on staff communication, attitudes and decision making. Archives of Physical and Medical Rehabilitation, 1975, 56, 269–274.Google Scholar
  25. DiSimoni, F. The Token Test for Children. Hingham, Mass.: Teaching Resources Corp., 1978.Google Scholar
  26. DiSimoni, F. G., Keith, R. L., & Darley, F. L. Prediction of PICA overall score by short versions of the test. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 1980, 23, 511–516.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. Eisenson, J. Adult aphasia: Assessment and treatment. New York: Appleton Century Crofts, 1973.Google Scholar
  28. Espir, M. L. E., & Rose, F. C. The basic neurology of speech. Philadelphia: Davis, 1970.Google Scholar
  29. Geschwind, N. Writing disturbances in acute confusional states. In R. S. Kohen, & M. W. Wartofsky (Eds.), N. Geschwind selected papers on language in the brain. Boston: Reidel, 1974.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Gianutsos, R. What is cognitive rehabilitation? Journal of Rehabilitation, 1980, 36-40.Google Scholar
  31. Gilchrist, E., & Wilkinson, M. Some factors determining prognosis in young people with severe head injury. Archives of Neurology, 1979, 36, 355–359.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Goldstein, K. After effects of brain injuries in war. New York: Grune & Stratton, 1942.Google Scholar
  33. Goldstein, K. Language and language disturbances. New York: Grune & Stratton, 1948.Google Scholar
  34. Gonzales, J., & Aronson, A. Palatal lift prosthesis for treatment of anatomic and neurologic palato-pharyngeal insufficiency. Cleft Palate Journal, 1970, 7, 90–104.Google Scholar
  35. Goodglass, H., & Kaplan, E. Boston diagnostic aphasia examination (BDAE). Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1972.Google Scholar
  36. Grabois, M. The problem-oriented medical record: Modification and simplification for rehabilitation medicine. Southern Medical Journal, 1977, 70, 1383–1385.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Granger, C. V., & Delabarre, E. M., Jr. Programmed examination formats: Use in rehabilitation medicine. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 1974, 55, 235–239.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  38. Granich, L. Aphasia: A guide to retraining. New York: Grune & Stratton, 1947.Google Scholar
  39. Halpern, H., Darley, F. L., & Brown, J. R. Differential language and neurological characteristics in cerebral involvement. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1973, 38, 162–173.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  40. Hanson, W. R., & Metter, E. J. DAF as instrumental treatment for dysarthria in progressive supranuclear palsy: A case report. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1980, 45, 268–276.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  41. Harper, R. G., Wrens, A. N., & Metarazzo, J. D. Non-verbal communication: The state of the art. New York: Wiley, 1978.Google Scholar
  42. Head, H. Aphasia and kindred disorders of speech. New York: Macmillan, 1926. (Reprinted by Hafner, New York, 1963.)Google Scholar
  43. Helm, N. A. Visual action therapy for global aphasic patients. Paper presented to the Academy of Aphasia, Chicago, 1978.Google Scholar
  44. Helm, N. A. Management of palilalia with a pacing board. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1979, 44, 350–353.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  45. Helm, N., Butler, R., & Benson, D. Acquired stuttering. Neurology, 1978, 28, 1159–1165.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Holland, A. Some current trends in aphasia rehabilitation. American Speech and Hearing Association, 1969, 11, 3–7.Google Scholar
  47. Holland, A. Communication abilities in daily living (CADL). Baltimore: University Park Press, 1980.Google Scholar
  48. Holland, A. L. Some practical considerations in aphasia rehabilitation. In M. Sullivan, & M. S. Kommers (Eds.) Rationale for adult aphasia therapy. Omaha: University Nebraska Medical Center, 1977.Google Scholar
  49. Holland, A. L. Observing functional communication of aphasic adults. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1982, 47, 50–56.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  50. Holland, A. L. Personal communication, 1978-1980.Google Scholar
  51. Isaacs, B., & Walkey, F. A. The measurement of mental impairment in geriatric practice. Gerontology Clinics, 1964, 6, 114–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Johns, D. F. (Ed.) Clinical management of neurogenic communicative disorders. Boston: Little, Brown, 1978.Google Scholar
  53. Johns, D. F., & Darley, F. L. Phonemic variability in apraxia of speech. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 1970, 13, 556–583.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  54. Johns, D. F., & Salyer, K. E. Surgical and prosthetic management of neurogenic speech disorders. In D. F. Johns (Ed.), Clinical management of neurogenic communicative disorders. Boston: Little, Brown, 1978.Google Scholar
  55. Johnson, C. Errorless learning in a multihandicapped adolescent. Education and Treatment of Children, 1977, 1, 25–33.Google Scholar
  56. Kent, L. R., & Chabon, S. S. Problem-oriented record in a university speech and hearing clinic. American Speech and Hearing Association, 1980, 22, 151–158.Google Scholar
  57. Kertesz, A., & Poole, E. The aphasia quotient: The taxonomic approach to measurement of aphasie disability. Canadian Journal of Neurological Science, 1974, 1, 7–16.Google Scholar
  58. Klonoff, H., Low, M. D., & Clark, C. Head injuries in children: A prospective five year follow-up. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, 1977, 40, 1211–1219.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Kushner, D., & Winitz, H. Extended comprehension practice applied to an aphasie patient. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1977, 42, 296–306.Google Scholar
  60. La Pointe, L. L. Base-10 programmed stimulation: Task specification, scoring and plotting performance in aphasia therapy. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1977, 42, 90–105.Google Scholar
  61. La Pointe, L. L. Aphasia therapy: Some principles and strategies for treatment. In D. F. Johns (Ed.), Clinical management of neurogenic communicative disorders. Boston: Little, Brown, 1978.Google Scholar
  62. La Pointe, L. L. Base-10 response form. Tigard, Ore.: C. C. Publications, Inc., 1979.Google Scholar
  63. Levin, H. S., Grossman, R. G., & Kelly, P. G. Aphasic disorder in patients with closed head injury. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, 1976, 39, 1062–1070.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Lozano, R., & Dreyer, D. Some effects of delayed auditory feedback on dyspraxia of speech. Journal of Communication Disorders, 1978, 11, 407–415.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Luria, A. R. Higher cortical functions in man. New York: Basic Books, 1966.Google Scholar
  66. Luria, A. R. Traumatic aphasia: Its syndromes, psychology and treatment. The Hague: Mouton, 1970.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Mandleberg, I. A., & Brooks, D. N. Cognitive recovery after severe head injury. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, 1975, 38, 1121–1126.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Marshall, R. C. Word retrieval of aphasic adults. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1976, 42, 444–451.Google Scholar
  69. McNeil, M. R. Porch Index of Communicative Ability. In F. L. Darley (Ed.), Evaluation of appraisal techniques in speech and language pathology. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1979.Google Scholar
  70. McNeil, M., Prescott, T., & Lemme, M. An application of electromyographic biofeedback of aphasia/apraxia treatment. In R. H. Brookshire (Ed.), Clinical aphasiology: Conference proceedings. Minneapolis: BRK Publishers, 1976.Google Scholar
  71. Milhous, R. L. The problem-oriented medical record in rehabilitation management and training. Archives of Physical and Medical Rehabilitation, 1972, 53, 182–185.Google Scholar
  72. Mills, C. K. Treatment of aphasia by training. Journal of the American Medical Association, 1904, 43, 1940–1949.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Moore, W. M., Rosenbek, J. C, & La Pointe, L. L. Assessment of oral apraxia in brain-injured adults. In R. H. Brookshire (Ed.), Clinical aphasiology: Conference proceedings. Minneapolis: BRK Publishers, 1976.Google Scholar
  74. Neef, N. A., Iwata, B. A., & Page, T. J. The effects of known item interspersal on acquisition and retention of spelling and sight-reading words. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1977, 10, 738.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Neef, N. A., Iwata, B. A., & Page, T. J. The effects of interspersal training versus high-density reinforcement on spelling acquisition and retention. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1980, 13, 153–158.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Netsell, R., & Cleeland, C. S. Modification of lip hypertonia in dysarthria using EMG feedback. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1973, 38, 131–140.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  77. Nielsen, J. M. Agnosia, apraxia, aphasia: Their value in cerebral localization. New York: Hoeber, 1947.Google Scholar
  78. Phillips, D. F. Long term care: Reality orientation. Hospitals, Journal of the American Hospital Association, 1973, 47, 46–49.Google Scholar
  79. Porch, B. E. Porch index of communicative ability. Palo Alto, Calif.: Consulting Psychologists Press, 1967, 1971.Google Scholar
  80. Porch, B. E., Wertz, R. T., & Collins, M. J. A statistical procedure for predicting recovery from aphasia. In B. E. Porch (Ed.), Proceedings of the conference on clinical aphasiology. New Orleans, La.: Veterans Administration Hospital, 1974.Google Scholar
  81. Reinstein, L. Problem-oriented medical record: Experience in 238 rehabilitation institutions. Archives of Physical and Medical Rehabilitation, 1977, 58, 398–401.Google Scholar
  82. Reinstein, L., Staas, W. E., Jr., & Marquette, C. H. A rehabilitation evaluation system which complements the problem-oriented medical record. Archives of Physical and Medical Rehabilitation, 1975, 56, 396–399.Google Scholar
  83. Rosenbek, J. C. Stuttering following brain damage. Brain and Language, 1978, 6, 82–96. (a)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Rosenbek, J. C. Treating apraxia of speech. In D. F. Johns (Ed.), Clinical management of neurogenic communicative disorders. Boston: Little, Brown, 1978. (b)Google Scholar
  85. Rosenbek, J. C, Lemme, M. L., Ahern, M. B., Harris, E. H., & Wertz, R. T. A treatment for apraxia of speech in adults. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1973, 38, 462–472.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  86. Rosenbek, J. C, Collins, M. J., & Wertz, R. T. Intersystemic reorganization for apraxia of speech. In R. Brookshire (Ed.), Clinical aphasiology: Conference proceedings. Minneapolis, Minn.: BRK Publishers, 1976.Google Scholar
  87. Sarno, M. T. Functional communication profile (FCP). New York: Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York University Medical Center, 1969.Google Scholar
  88. Sarno, M., Silverman, M., & Sands, E. Speech therapy and language recovery in severe aphasia. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 1970, 13, 607–623.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  89. Schreibman, L. Effects of within-stimulus and extra-stimulus prompting on discrimination learning in autistic children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1975, 8, 91–112.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. Schuell, H. A short examination for aphasia. Neurology, 1957, 7, 625–635.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. Schuell, H. The Minnesota test for differential diagnosis of aphasia (MTDDA). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1965, 1972.Google Scholar
  92. Schuell, H., Jenkins, J. J., & Jimenez-Pabon, E. Aphasia in adults: Diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. New York: Harper & Row, 1964.Google Scholar
  93. Seron, X., Deloche, G., Moulard, G., & Rousselle, M. A computer-based therapy for the treatment of aphasic subjects with writing disorders. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1980, 45, 45–58.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  94. Shaffer, D., Bijur, P., Chadwick, O. F. D., & Rutter, M. L. Head injury and later reading disability. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 1980, 19, 592–610.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  95. Shames, G. H., & Florance, C. L. Stutter-free speech: A goal for therapy. Columbus, Ohio: Merrill, 1980.Google Scholar
  96. Shewan, C. M., & Kertesz, A. Reliability and validity characteristics of the Western aphasia battery (WAB). Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1980, 45, 308–324.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  97. Silverman, F. H. Communication for the speechless. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1980.Google Scholar
  98. Skelly, M. Amer-Ind gestural code. New York: Elsevier, 1979.Google Scholar
  99. Skelly, M., Shinsky, L., Smith, R. W., & Fust, R. S. American Indian sign (Amerind) as a facilitator of verbalization for the oral verbal apraxic. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1974, 39, 445–456.Google Scholar
  100. Snell, M. Personal communication, 1979.Google Scholar
  101. Sparks, R., Helm, N., & Albert, M. Aphasia rehabilitation resulting from melodic intonation therapy. Cortex, 1974, 10, 303–316.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  102. Sparks, R. W., & Holland, A. L. Method: Melodic intonation therapy for aphasia. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1976, 41, 287–297.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  103. Spreen, O., & Benton, A. L. Neurosensory center comprehensive examination for aphasia (NC-CEA). Victoria, B.C.: University Victoria Neuropsychology Laboratory, 1969, 1977.Google Scholar
  104. Stachowiak, F. J., Huber, W., Poeck, K., & Kerschensteiner, M. Text comprehension in aphasia. Brain and Language, 1977, 4, 177–195.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Stover, S., & Ziegler, H. Head injury in children and teenagers: Functional recovery correlated with duration of coma. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 1976, 57, 201–205.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  106. Swisher, L. Functional communication profile. In F. L. Darley (Ed.) Evaluation of appraisal techniques in speech and language pathology. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1979.Google Scholar
  107. Touchette, P. Transfer of stimulus control: Measuring the moment of transfer. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 1971, 15, 347–354.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  108. Vanderheiden, G. C, & Grilley, K. Non-vocal communication techniques and aids for the severely physically handicapped. Baltimore: University Park Press, 1977.Google Scholar
  109. Weisenburg, T., & McBride, K. Aphasia. New York: Commonwealth Fund, Division of Publications, 1935.Google Scholar
  110. Wepman, J. M. Recovery from aphasia. New York: Ronald Press, 1951.Google Scholar
  111. Wertz, R. T. Neuropathologies of speech and language: An introduction to patient management. In D. F. Johns (Ed.), Clinical management of neurogenic communicative disorders. Boston: Little, Brown, 1978.Google Scholar
  112. Wertz, R. T. The token test. In F. L. Darley (Ed.) Evaluation of appraisal techniques in speech and language pathology. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1979. (a)Google Scholar
  113. Wertz, R. T. Word fluency measure. In F. L. Darley (Ed.) Evaluation of appraisal techniques in speech and language pathology. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1979. (b)Google Scholar
  114. Wertz, R. T., Rosenbek, J. C, and Deal, J. L. A review of 228 cases of apraxia of speech: Classification, etiology, and localization. Presented to the American Speech and Hearing Association, New York, N.Y., 1970.Google Scholar
  115. Whitney, J. Developing aphasics’ use of compensatory strategies. Paper presented to the American Speech and Hearing Association, Washington, D.C., 1975.Google Scholar
  116. Wilcox, M., Davis, A., & Leonard, L. Aphasics’ comprehension of contextually conveyed meaning. Brain and Language, 1978, 6, 362–377.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  117. Wilkinson, M. The prognosis of severe head injuries in young adults. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine, 1969, 62, 541–542.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  118. Wilson, S. A. K. Aphasia. London: Trubner, 1926.Google Scholar
  119. Wolfe, V. F., & Cuvo, A. J. Effects of within-stimulus and extra-stimulus prompting on letter discrimination by mentally retarded persons. American Journal of Mental Deficiency, 1978, 83, 297–303.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louise Kent-Udolf
    • 1
  1. 1.Education Service Center, Region IICorpus ChristiUSA

Personalised recommendations