The Role of the Physiotherapist in the Treatment of Hyperventilation

  • Elizabeth A. Holloway

Abstract

I have been using the treatment techniques described here almost daily since 1979. They are largely based on the methods developed and used by the consultant chest physician Dr. L.C. Lum (1977) and physiotherapists Diana Innocenti (1987) and Rosemary Cluff (1984), all at Papworth Hospital, Cambridgeshire. The treatment consists of carefully assessing hyperventilators, educating them into an awareness of the problem, encouraging them to observe present erratic breathing patterns and to consciously convert to a slow, rhythmic, abdominal pattern that eventually becomes automatic. The aim is to reduce the volume of air moved in and out of the lungs so that it is appropriate for the metabolic rate at that time, thus enabling a normal Pco2 to be maintained. Finally, patients are taught to recognize unnecessary stress and tension in the body and mind, and to learn to remedy this by using simple relaxation methods, both general and specific.

Keywords

Panic Attack Abdominal Muscle Breathing Pattern Normal Breathing Breathing Exercise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth A. Holloway
    • 1
  1. 1.Knebworth Physiotherapy ClinicKnebworth, HertfordshireEngland

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