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Providing Outclinic Services

Evaluating Treatment and Social Validity
  • David P. Wacker
  • Mark W. Steege
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

The implementation and evaluation of effective behavioral treatments is most commonly conducted in controlled settings, such as inpatient units, residential facilities, or classrooms. This occurs because those settings provide opportunities for direct observation over extended time periods. Direct observation of trends in behavior, when coupled with measures of treatment integrity, provides the information needed to evaluate functional control (i.e., the relation between the independent and dependent variables can be directly assessed within subjects over time and across treatment conditions). Functional control over behavior is a necessary condition for defining an effective treatment, and thus the majority of behavioral research is completed within controlled settings.

Keywords

Aggressive Behavior Target Behavior Apply Behavior Analysis Social Validity Functional Communication Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • David P. Wacker
    • 1
  • Mark W. Steege
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity Hospital School, University of IowaIowa CityUSA
  2. 2.School Psychology ProgramUniversity of Southern MaineGorhamUSA

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