Promoting Generalization

Current Status and Functional Considerations
  • Glen Dunlap
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

The overriding and fundamental goal of behavioral treatment has to do with personal welfare (Van Houten et al., 1988). The effectiveness of behavioral interventions must therefore be evaluated in terms of the extent to which such interventions solve significant problems and/or produce meaningful enhancements of a person’s life-style (Horner, Dunlap, & Koegel, 1988). Demonstrations of behavior modification are not sufficient. The changes must represent meaningful outcomes and life-style adjustments for the person or persons being served (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968).

Keywords

Stimulus Control Discriminative Stimulus Autistic Child Parent Training Promote Generalization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glen Dunlap
    • 1
  1. 1.Florida Mental Health InstituteUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA

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