Communication-Based Treatment of Severe Behavior Problems

  • Edward G. Carr
  • Gene McConnachie
  • Len Levin
  • Duane C. Kemp
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to describe the role of communication training in the reduction or elimination of serious behavior problems in persons with developmental disabilities. We will discuss clinical and conceptual guidelines for implementing a communication-based approach. It is not our intent to provide a treatment manual; such a manual is currently being field tested and will be forthcoming in a separate publication. The material in this chapter does, however, define the major elements of our approach.

Keywords

Behavior Problem Treatment Agent Developmental Disability Discriminative Stimulus Group Home 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward G. Carr
    • 1
  • Gene McConnachie
    • 1
  • Len Levin
    • 1
  • Duane C. Kemp
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA

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