Bee Products pp 137-150 | Cite as

The Exocrine Glands of the Honey Bees

Their Structure and Secretory Products
  • Pierre Cassier
  • Yaacov Lensky

Abstract

The insect societies are stable structures submitted to various qualitative and quantitative regulations funded on the perception of mechanical, acoustic, visual and mainly chemical stimuli. The chemical informations provided by the biotic environment are named allomones if they trigger a defensive behaviour, kairomone if they allow an attractive one to the emitor. The pheromones secreted by conspecific individuals, belonging or not to the same group or society, act immediatly on the behaviour (primer) or after a lag time on the physiology (releaser) of the receptive insect. The blend or pheromonal bouquet is truly the identity card of each insect.

Keywords

Mandibular Gland Glandular Cell Alarm Pheromone Exocrine Gland Tarsal Gland 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pierre Cassier
    • 1
  • Yaacov Lensky
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire d’Evolution des Etres organisésUniversité Pierre et Marie CurieParisFrance
  2. 2.Faculty of Agriculture Triwaks Bee Research CenterThe Hebrew University of JerusalemRehovotIsrael

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