Penicillin Induced Bacteriolysis of Staphylococci as a Post-Mortem Consequence of Murosome-Mediated Killing Via Wall Perforation and Attempts to Imitate this Perforation Process without Applying Antibiotics

  • Peter Giesbrecht
  • Thomas Kersten
  • Kazimierz Madela
  • Harald Grob
  • Peter Blümel
  • Jörg Wecke
Part of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies Symposium Series book series (FEMS, volume 65)

Abstract

In the early years of microbiological research, scientists coined the term “bacteriolysis” to describe the loss of turbidity of a bacterial culture. Viewing such a population under a microscope revealed that most or even all of the bacteria had disappeared. Today, the definition of bacteriolysis is basically still the same. It is understood as the disintegration of the bacterial shape which is accompanied by a reduced optical density of the culture and by a decline of the number of cells. In this contribution, we are using the term “bacteriolysis” strictly in this sense.

Keywords

Cell Separation Cationic Protein Killing Rate Division Plane Lactam Antibiotic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Giesbrecht
    • 1
  • Thomas Kersten
    • 1
  • Kazimierz Madela
    • 1
  • Harald Grob
    • 1
  • Peter Blümel
    • 1
  • Jörg Wecke
    • 1
  1. 1.Federal Health OfficeRobert Koch-InstituteBerlin 65Germany

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