The Educational Needs of the Autistic Adolescent

  • H. D. Bud Fredericks
  • Jay Buckley
  • Victor L. Baldwin
  • William Moore
  • Kathleen Stremel-Campbell
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

While significant strides have been made toward providing more effective techniques for teaching the autistic child and adolescent, and although the educational opportunities for these students have increased within the last 10 years, appropriate educational programs for the autistic population are not yet a reality. In this chapter we focus on the educational needs of the autistic adolescent and describe the characteristics of autistic children that determine what special education should offer. The characteristics of the educational environment and the specific curricular areas to achieve these overall objectives are outlined. We discuss the interaction of the parent with the school to help implement the curriculum, and indicate some considerations of classroom management that we feel must be present to accommodate the specific characteristics of autistic adolescents.

Keywords

Autistic Child Educational Environment Apply Behavior Analysis Inappropriate Behavior Curricular Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. D. Bud Fredericks
    • 1
  • Jay Buckley
    • 1
  • Victor L. Baldwin
    • 1
  • William Moore
    • 1
  • Kathleen Stremel-Campbell
    • 1
  1. 1.Teaching Research Infant and Child CenterMonmouthUSA

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