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Energy and Angular Distributions of Secondary Electrons Produced by Electron Impact Ionization

  • Yong-Ki Kim

Abstract

Atomic and molecular cross sections for electron impact ionization are of fundamental importance in modeling the interaction of charged particles with matter. In order to follow the history of the ejected electrons and understand the subsequent events and products, not only the total ionization cross sections but often the cross sections differential in ejected electron energies and angles are also needed.

Keywords

Angular Distribution Secondary Electron Differential Cross Section Primary Electron Ionization Cross Section 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yong-Ki Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA

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