Assessment of Visually Handicapped Preschoolers

  • Verna Hart

Abstract

Education of preschool visually impaired children has quite a long history because it was one of the first special services to be provided at the preschool level. In spite of this, there is still not a battery of tests that is recognized as optimal that can be used to assess the children. Thus, assessment information must come from many individuals, with some material of greater use than others.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Fine Motor Handicapped Child Impaired Child Object Permanence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Verna Hart
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PittsburghUSA

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