Optical-To-Electrical Power Conversion and Data Transmission Module

  • Pentti Karioja
  • Risto Jurva
  • Kimmo Keränen
  • Kari Tukkiniemi
  • Jouko Lammasniemi
  • Ari Tervonen
  • Marja Englund

Abstract

Use of optical fiber to supply power for an electrical sensor or actuator is advantageous in applications where galvanic isolation between a control and remote unit is required or when immunity to electromagnetic interferences, intrinsic safety, small size, or light weight are needed. When a conventional sensor is equipped with an optical fiber, the sensor is called a fiber optic hybrid sensor (Gross, 1991; Ross, 1992); when the current conducting paths of a conventional system are replaced by optical fibers, the system is called a power-by-light (PBL) system (Landry et al., 1991). Optically powered sensors and actuators are advantageous, for example, in electric power plant instrumentation to provide galvanic isolation between a remote sensor or actuator unit and a control unit.

Keywords

Optical Power Power Conversion Efficiency Photovoltaic Cell Output Waveguide Matrix Converter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pentti Karioja
    • 1
  • Risto Jurva
    • 1
  • Kimmo Keränen
    • 1
  • Kari Tukkiniemi
    • 1
  • Jouko Lammasniemi
    • 2
  • Ari Tervonen
    • 3
  • Marja Englund
    • 4
  1. 1.VTT ElectronicsOuluFinland
  2. 2.Tampere University of TechnologyTampereFinland
  3. 3.Optonex LtdEspooFinland
  4. 4.IVO GroupVantaaFinland

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