Application of Combined X-Ray Photoelectron/Auger Spectroscopy to Studies of Inorganic Materials

  • Dale L. Perry

Abstract

Many materials that are of interest to materials scientists are inorganic in nature. Some of the more common ones are nitrides (Ni3N3), arsenides (GaAs), intermetallic compounds (Ni3Al), metallic carbides (CaC2), and multimetal mixed oxides (relatively recent superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O7 and their related compounds). As is the case with all materials, a researcher is very interested in studying many facets of the characterization of the solids, including lattice structure, bonding, and electronic structure. In order to obtain types of information such as these, a variety of experimental approaches must be used. No single type of instrumentation can give a total picture of a material, but several techniques can complement one another to contribute pieces of the description.

Keywords

Binding Energy Inorganic Material Satellite Structure Auger Spectrum Auger Spectroscopy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dale L. Perry
    • 1
  1. 1.Lawrence Berkeley LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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