New Initiatives in Combination Antiretroviral Chemotherapy

  • James F. Rooney
  • John C. Warwick
  • Mary M. Elkins
  • Marty H. St. Clair
  • David W. Barry
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 394)

Abstract

Although monotherapy with available antiretroviral agents has proved useful in terms of delaying disease progression and improving the survival of persons with AIDS, the utility of these compounds as single agents is limited by several factors, including incomplete suppression of viral replication, the emergence of resistant virus, and a gradual increase in viral burden over time.1,2 As the benefit of antiretroviral monotherapy wanes, immune function decreases, leading to disease progression and ultimately death.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Trough Level Antiviral Effect Viral Inoculum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • James F. Rooney
  • John C. Warwick
  • Mary M. Elkins
  • Marty H. St. Clair
  • David W. Barry

There are no affiliations available

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