Delavirdine Mesylate, a Potent Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor

  • William W. Freimuth
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 394)

Abstract

Delavirdine mesylate (U-90152, DLV) is a potent second generation non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) from a new class of bisheteroarylpiperizine (BHAP) compounds discovered at Upjohn Laboratories.1–5

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type Antimicrob Agent Nonnucleoside Inhibitor Delavirdine Mesylate Infected Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • William W. Freimuth

There are no affiliations available

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