The Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Streptococcus Pyogenes Isolates from the Philadelphia Area

  • Anthony L. Ferraro
  • Joel E. Mortensen
  • Deborah L. Blecker
  • Chanhpheng Phengvath
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 390)

Abstract

Since the early 1980’s, reports from North America, Australia, Japan and Europe have indicated that Streptococcus pyogenes strains are becoming increasingly resistant to several antimicrobial agents.1–6 In order to determine if an increase in antimicrobial resistance was present in S. pyogenes from the greater Philadelphia area isolates from eleven Philadelphia hospitals, were collected and tested against penicillin, ampicillin, cephalothin, clindamycin, erythromycin, rifampin, vancomycin and ciprofloxacin.

Keywords

Minimum Inhibitory Concentration Antimicrobial Agent Antimicrobial Susceptibility Erythromycin Resistance Minimum Inhibitory Concentration Range 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony L. Ferraro
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Joel E. Mortensen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Deborah L. Blecker
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Chanhpheng Phengvath
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.College of Graduate StudiesThomas Jefferson UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of LaboratoriesSt. Christopher’s Hospital for ChildrenPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of PediatricsTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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