Mechanisms for the Translation and Communication of Developmental Theory

  • Michael C. Boyes
Part of the Annals of Theoretical Psychology book series (AOTP, volume 10)

Abstract

Reading overviews of the theorists, theories, and research practices of developmental psychologists in other cultures, such as that offered by Venger in this volume, are a form of scholarly travel. As with actual travel to foreign lands, such journeys are often motivated by a somewhat confused admixture of curiosity, openness to new experiences, and a vague sense of need. This sense of need reflects the extent to which both types of journeys constitute quests for means by which we can better make sense of our worlds of experience.

Keywords

Cognitive Development Social Cognition Perspective Taking Proximal Development Zone Ofproximal Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael C. Boyes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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