Angiogenesis pp 157-163 | Cite as

Thymosin Beta 4 Promotes Endothelial Cell Migration and Angiogenesis

  • Katherine M. Malinda
  • Allan L. Goldstein
  • Derrick S. Grant
  • Hynda K. Kleinman
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 298)

Abstract

The basement membrane associated with endothelial cells is important in regulating the passage of macromolecules and cells in and out of the circulation, forming a barrier to the underlying stroma and maintaining the differentiated phenotype of the endothelial cells (Grant et al., 1990). During the formation of new blood vessels, the basement membrane is first degraded and then the endothelial cells migrate away from the vessel, proliferate at the site of migration initiation and subsequently a new basement membrane is synthesized when the vessel is formed. Normally the vasculature is fairly stable with minimal turnover. During tissue formation, in wound repair and in certain diseases, considerable increases in vessel formation occur (Folkman, 1992). Using in vitro and in vivo assays, a number of factors have been described that regulate this process. Many of these factors are either stored in the basement membrane or produced by cells in response to the basement membrane.

Keywords

Basement Membrane Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Tube Formation Endothelial Cell Migration Boyden Chamber Assay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine M. Malinda
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Allan L. Goldstein
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Derrick S. Grant
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hynda K. Kleinman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.National Institute of Dental ResearchNIHBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryGeorge Washington University Medical CenterUSA
  3. 3.Cardeza Foundation for Hemaotological Research, Thomas JeffersonUniversity College of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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