Advertisement

Heterogeneity of ANCA Sera Showing Atypical, Peripheral and Classical Cytoplasmic Immunofluorescence Patterns

  • Gratien Dalpé
  • Fatima Fernandes
  • Carol Richard
  • Gilles Boire
  • Henri A. Ménard
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 336)

Summary

Atypical (A) ANCA immunofluorescence (IF) patterns have been described in several disease groups. We have previously reported a distinct cytoplasmic A-ANCA in 7–10% of patients with SLE and/or RA. Here, we show that these rheumatic disease associated A-ANCAs are best identified using U937 cells as substrate and that they do not target either a serine proteinase or a peroxydase. Furthermore, these sera immunoprecipitate a 40 kDa or a 42 kDa band using in vivo 35S-amino acid labelled HL60 or U937 cell extracts, respectively. Although these bands are the only one seen with pure A-ANCA sera, they can also be found in addition to the expected bands of PR3 or MPO in up to 30% of bona fide C- or P-ANCA sera. These data confirm and extend our previous observations. They also suggest that target heterogeneity of ANCA antibodies is frequent. Care should thus be taken in interpreting in a cause and effect relationship, an IF pattern or a biological effect produced by a serum with ill documented monospecificity. The exact nature and significance of this (these) new antigen(s) have yet to be clarified.

Keywords

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus U937 Cell HL60 Cell Cytospin Preparation Human PMNs 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Wright, J., Yoshimoto, S., Offner, G.D., Blanchard, R.A., Troxler, R., and Tauber, A.I., 1987. Structural characterization of the isoenzymatic forms of human myeloperoxydase. Biochim Biophys Acta 534: 45–54.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lucena-Fernandes, M.F., Duhaime, N., Richard, C., Boire, G. et Ménard, H.A., 1992. Anticorps anticytoplasme de neutrophiles en pathologies humaines. Union Méd Can. 121:in press. (Abstracted in Am J Kidney Dis 18(2):20,1991).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lucena-Fernandes, M.F., Richard, C. and Ménard, H.A., 1991. Fine specificity of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus sera containing anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Arthritis Rheum 34(suppl): S69 (A24).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Boyum, A., 1968. Isolation of mononuclear cells and granulocytes from human blood. Scand J Clin Lab Invest 97 (suppl): 77–89.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Lynch, M.J., Raphael, S.S., Mellor, L.D., Spare, P.D. and Inwood, M.J.H., 1969. Medical laboratory technology and clinical pathology. W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia, London, Toronto.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Borregaard, N., Heiple, J.M., Simons, E.R. and Clark, R.A., 1983. Subcellular localization of the b-cytochrome component of the human neutrophil microbicidal oxidase: translocation during activation. J Cell Biol 97: 52–61.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Rasmussen, N., Sjolin, C., Isak:,aon, B., Bygren, P. and Wieslander, J., 1990. An ELISA for the detection of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies ( ANCA ). J Immunol Methods 127: 139–145.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Boire, G. and Craft, J., 1989. Biochemical and immunological heterogeneity of the Ro -ribonucleo protein particles. Analysis with sera specific for the RohY5 particle. J Clin Invest 84: 270–279.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gratien Dalpé
    • 1
  • Fatima Fernandes
    • 1
  • Carol Richard
    • 1
  • Gilles Boire
    • 1
  • Henri A. Ménard
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Rheumatology Department of Medicine Faculty of Medicine and University HospitalUniversity of SherbrookeSherbrookeCanada

Personalised recommendations