Pathogenic Potential of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibodies

  • J. Charles Jennette
  • Ronald J. Falk
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 336)

Abstract

Although the close association between anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic auto-antibodies (ANCA) and various forms of systemic vasculitis is well documented1, there is no proof that ANCA are directly involved in the pathogenesis of vasculitis. Several of the presentations in this symposium will offer in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence that ANCA do have a pathogenic role, but a convincing animal model of ANCA-induced vasculitis has not yet been described.

Keywords

Respiratory Burst Chronic Granulomatous Disease Granule Protein Produce Oxygen Radical Primed Neutrophil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Charles Jennette
    • 1
  • Ronald J. Falk
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Pathology, School of MedicineUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Medicine School of MedicineUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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