Economics of Mental Health

  • Milton Greenblatt
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

Consider the recent explosive growth of the area of economics and mental health. In the late 1970s, when the Division of Biometry and Epidemiology of the National Institute of Mental Health began to develop the field,1 there were then no well-recognized authorities, nor a significant bibliography; by 1987, a publication was forthcoming every two weeks. Doctoral training programs have now been initiated in several schools. Today we have an established body of knowledge, recognized specialists, and a flow of talented students and researchers. Let us consider herewith recent and current developments in this field.

Keywords

Mental Health Mental Health Care Cochlear Implant Employee Assistance Program Manage Care System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milton Greenblatt
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Olive View Medical Center — Los Angeles CountySylmarUSA
  2. 2.University of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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