Power and Decision Making in Organizational Context

  • Milton Greenblatt
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

The uses and abuses of power have fascinated men and women for genera­tions. In 1532, Machiavelli1 outlined the use of guile, deceit, and opportunism in the pursuit and maintenance of power. His cynical view of man justified his efforts at their domination and subjugation:

Men in general ... are ungrateful, voluble, dissemblers, anxious to avoid danger, and covetous of gain; as long as you benefit them, they are en­tirely yours; they offer you their blood, their goods, their life, and their children ... when the necessity is remote; but when it approaches, they revolt.

Abstain from taking the property of others, for men forget more easily the death of their father than the loss of their patrimony.2

Keywords

Leadership Style Large Organization Harvard Business Review Conditioned Power Interpersonal Influence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milton Greenblatt
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Olive View Medical Center — Los Angeles CountySylmarUSA
  2. 2.University of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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