Cellular Acetylcholine Receptor Expression in the Brain of Patients with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Dementia

  • Hannsjörg Schröder
  • Christina Lobron
  • Andrea Wevers
  • Alfred Maelicke
  • Ezio Giacobini
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 44)

Abstract

Binding studies and receptor autoradiography reveal the overall changes of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s dementia cortices.2,5 A detailed account of these changes requires a study of neurochemical phenotype of individual neurons as basic elements of networks constituting the substrate of cortical functions.4 Examples will be given for cell-type specific AChR localization in normal and diseased human cerebral cortex.

Keywords

Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Human Cerebral Cortex Human Frontal Cortex Total Neuron Number Human Cortical Neuron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hannsjörg Schröder
    • 1
  • Christina Lobron
    • 2
  • Andrea Wevers
    • 1
  • Alfred Maelicke
    • 2
  • Ezio Giacobini
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of AnatomyUniversity of KölnKölnGermany
  2. 2.Institute for Physiological Chemistry and PathobiochemistryUniversity of MainzMainzGermany
  3. 3.Department of PharmacologySouthern Illinois UniversitySpringfieldUSA

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