Historical Context

  • William S. DavidsonII
  • Robin Redner
  • Richard L. Amdur
  • Christina M. Mitchell

Abstract

Concern over crime and juvenile delinquency has remained prominent in American society. In annual surveys conducted from 1972 through 1984, American citizens were asked, “Is there more crime in this area than there was a year ago, or less?” In each year except one, the most common response was “more crime,” indicating the belief that concern about crime has been an ever-increasing phenomenon in this society (Gallup, 1984). In similar surveys from 1965 through 1984, respondents were asked, “Is there any area right around here—that is, within a mile—where you would be afraid to walk alone at night?” Over the last 17 years, the proportion of respondents indicating fear in their own neighborhood has steadily increased from one-third to nearly one-half. Nearly half worry about their homes’ being burglarized. Nearly seven out of eight would like to have a crime prevention program in their neighborhoods. Consistently, crime and lawlessness have been mentioned as one of the top five issues about which people are most concerned (Roper, 1985).

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Capital Punishment Juvenile Offender Juvenile Justice System Juvenile Delinquency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • William S. DavidsonII
    • 1
  • Robin Redner
    • 1
  • Richard L. Amdur
    • 2
  • Christina M. Mitchell
    • 3
  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  2. 2.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.New York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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