Stereochemical Control in Ziegler-Natta Catalysts

  • S. E. Wilson
  • W. L. Callender
  • R. C. Job
Conference paper

Abstract

The remarkably high level of stereoselectivity associated with magnesium chloride-based catalysts is realized only in the presence of a selectivity control agent (SCA), frequently an aromatic ester.1 The usual effect of the SCA is to reduce activity while significantly enhancing stereoselectivity.2 Fortunately, the reduction in productivity (65%) is not as great as the reduction in atactiticy (92%) (Figure 1).

Keywords

Magnesium Chloride Titanium Tetrachloride Ethyl Benzoate Alkylation Product Strong Lewis Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. E. Wilson
    • 1
  • W. L. Callender
    • 1
  • R. C. Job
    • 1
  1. 1.Shell Development CompanyHoustonUSA

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