Peripheral Reaction Mechanisms in Intermediate Energy Heavy-Ion Reactions

  • D. E. Russ
  • A. C. Mignerey
  • E. J. Garcia-Solis
  • H. Madani
  • J. Y. Shea
  • P. J. Stanskas
  • O. Bjarki
  • E. E. Gualtieri
  • S. A. Hannuschke
  • R. Pak
  • N. T. B. Stone
  • A. M. VanderMolen
  • G. D. Westfall
  • J. Yee

Abstract

At beam energies up to E/A = 20 MeV deep-inelastic reactions are the dominant reaction mechanism for heavy-ion peripheral collisions. These reactions are characterized by broadening of the mass and charge distributions with increasing energy loss or excitation energy and by orbiting in the deflection functions. Excitation energy is produced through the relative momentum of exchanged nucleons. The deep-inelastic reaction mechanism is a very efficient way to produce hot nuclei at relatively low beam energies.

Keywords

Grazing Angle Elastic Peak Deflection Function Intermediate Mass Fragment Increase Energy Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    D.E. Russ et al., DOE/ER/40802-6 Appendix B.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    G.D. Westfall et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A238 347 (1985).ADSGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    L. Tassan-Got and C. Stephan, Nucl. Phys. A524 121(1991).ADSGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    W. Bauer et al., Phys. Rev. C 34, 2127 (1986).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    E.J. Garcia-Solis and A.C. Mignerey, Phys. Rev. C 54, 276 (1996).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    R.J. Charity et al., Nucl. Phys. A483 391 (1988).ADSGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    J.P. Bondorf et al., Phys. Rep. 257 135 (1995).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    W.W. Wilke et al., Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables 29, 389 (1980).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. E. Russ
    • 1
  • A. C. Mignerey
    • 1
  • E. J. Garcia-Solis
    • 1
  • H. Madani
    • 1
  • J. Y. Shea
    • 1
  • P. J. Stanskas
    • 1
  • O. Bjarki
    • 2
  • E. E. Gualtieri
    • 2
  • S. A. Hannuschke
    • 2
  • R. Pak
    • 2
  • N. T. B. Stone
    • 2
  • A. M. VanderMolen
    • 2
  • G. D. Westfall
    • 2
  • J. Yee
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryUniversity of Maryland College ParkCollege ParkUSA
  2. 2.National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and AstronomyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

Personalised recommendations