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The Macroscopic Liquid-Drop Collisions Project: A Progress Report

  • A. Menchaca-Rocha
  • A. Martínez-Dávalos
  • F. Huidobro
  • A. Noguchi
  • R. Nuñes

Abstract

In previous workshops of this series we presented results of the fragmentation observed in collisions of equal-size mercury-drop pairs[1], and a comparison[2] of these data with predictions of a dynamic nuclear reaction model[3], modified to allow the simulation of macroscopic liquid-drop collisions[4]. In the last presentation[2] we also showed preliminary results of an experiment designed to investigate the formation of “exotic shapes” (sheets and donuts) predicted to occur in heavy-ion collisions[5]. The motivation for this seemingly wayward approach, of hoping to learn something about nuclear dynamics from what is observed in macroscopic liquid-drop collisions, can be found in the written versions of our previous presentations. Here we give a progress report on two subjects. The first is a study of the evolution of the surface shape of a system composed by two, equal-size, drops put in contact at the lowest possible relative velocity. The second is related to a qualitative description of the instabilities of the exotic shapes reported previously[2] in central collisions of equal-size drops.

Keywords

Shape Evolution Nuclear Dynamics Ternary Fission Intermediate Mass Fragment High Order Parametrization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Menchaca-Rocha
    • 1
  • A. Martínez-Dávalos
    • 1
  • F. Huidobro
    • 2
  • A. Noguchi
    • 2
  • R. Nuñes
    • 2
  1. 1.Instituto de FísicaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoMéxico D.F.México
  2. 2.Facultad de CienciasUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoMéxico D.F.México

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