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Meloidogyne Stylet Secretions

  • Richard S. Hussey
  • Eric L. Davis
  • Celeste Ray
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 268)

Abstract

The feeding relationships parasitic nematodes have evolved with susceptible plants are diverse. Relationships may be relatively simple, such as those of certain migratory ectoparasitic nematodes which feed on epidermal cells of plant roots without killing the cells. Or relationships may be complex, such as those of the sedentary endoparasitic nematodes which modify plant cells into highly specialized feeding sites. Bioactive molecules synthesized in the esophageal glands and secreted through the nematode’s protrusible stylet regulate plant-nematode interactions. These stylet secretions may function in penetration and migration of nematodes in plant tissue, modification and maintenance of plant cells as feeding sites, formation of feeding tubes, and/or digestion of host cell contents to facilitate nutrient acquisition by the nematode. Secretory molecules from sedentary endoparasites are particularly intriguing because of the complex changes in plant cell phenotype and function that they modulate.

Keywords

Secretory Granule Parasitic Nematode Plant Parasitic Nematode Secretory Component Wall Ingrowth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard S. Hussey
    • 1
  • Eric L. Davis
    • 1
  • Celeste Ray
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant PathologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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