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Changes in Respiratory Control during and after 48 Hours of Both Isocapnic and Poikilocapnic Hypoxia in Humans

  • John G. Tansley
  • Marzieh Fatemian
  • Marc J. Poulin
  • Peter A. Robbins
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 450)

Abstract

During an 8 h period of either isocapnic or poikilocapnic hypoxia, tests of the acute ventilatory response to hypoxia (AHVR) have shown that there is an increase in hypoxic sensitivity (2) accompanied by an increase in ventilation under conditions of acute hyperoxia (3). These changes were similar between the two protocols suggesting a direct effect of hypoxia per se.

References

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    Howard, L.S.G.E., R.A. Barson, B.P.A. Howse, T.R. McGill, M.E. McIntyre, D.F. O’Connor, and P.A. Robbins. A chamber for controlling the end-tidal gas tensions over sustained periods in humans. J. Appl. Physiol 78: 1088–1091, 1995.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Howard, L.S.G.E., and P.A. Robbins. Alterations in respiratory control during eight hours of isocapnic and poikilocapnic hypoxia in humans. J. Appl. Physiol. 78: 1098–1107, 1995.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tansley, J.G., C. Clar, M.E.F. Pedersen, and P.A. Robbins. Human ventilatory response to acute hyperoxia during and after 8 h of both isocapnic and poikilocapnic hypoxia. J. Appl. Physiol. 82(2): 513–519, 1997.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • John G. Tansley
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marzieh Fatemian
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marc J. Poulin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peter A. Robbins
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University Laboratory of PhysiologyOxfordUK
  2. 2.University of OxfordOxfordUK

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