Modulation of Ventilatory Sensitivity to Hypoxia by Dopamine and Domperidone before and after Prolonged Exposure to Hypoxia in Humans

  • Michala E. F. Pedersen
  • Keith L. Dorrington
  • Peter A. Robbins
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 450)

Abstract

Acclimatisation to altitude involves an increase in the ventilatory sensitivity to hypoxia (AHVR). Since low dose dopamine decreases AHVR and domperidone increases the same (1), then the increase in AHVR at altitude may be generated by a decrease in peripheral dopaminergic activity. There is evidence to support this in cats (2), but not so far in humans. We hypothesised that, if dopamine activity is decreased by prolonged hypoxia, then the effect of the blockade would also be decreased. In order to determine whether there are any changes in the sensitivity to dopamine, the study also compares the inhibitory effects on AHVR of low dose dopamine infusions with and without prior sustained hypoxia.

Keywords

Prolonged Exposure Dopaminergic Activity Tory Effect Park Road Dopamine Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Bascom, D. A., I. D. Clement, K. L. Dorrington & P. A. Robbins. Effect of dopamine and domperidone on ventilation during isocapnic hypoxia in humans. Respir. Physiol. 85: 319–328, 1991.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Tatsumi, K., C. K. Pickett & J. V. Weil. Decreased carotid body hypoxic sensitivity in chronic hypoxia: role of dopamine. Respir. Physiol. 101: 47–57, 1995.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michala E. F. Pedersen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Keith L. Dorrington
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peter A. Robbins
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University Laboratory of PhysiologyOxfordUK
  2. 2.University of OxfordOxfordUK

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