Epoxy Resin Developments for the Atlas and CMS Superconducting Magnets Impregnation

  • J. M. Rey
  • B. Gallet
  • F. Kircher
  • J. C. Lottin
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials book series (ACRE, volume 42)

Abstract

Two huge superconducting magnets are now under design for the future detectors of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN: the ATLAS toroidal system and the CMS solenoid. Both of them are designed to be wet impregnated with epoxy resin. Because of their large dimensions, and the indirect cooling of the superconductor, the strength of the resin and of the resin/conductor interface is of major importance. A new generation of epoxy resins for vacuum/pressure impregnation methods are now tested. Special care is taken to understand the influence of the macromolecular structure and of the cure cycle on the mechanical behaviour of the resin at cryogenic temperature. The paper will present preliminary results about the mechanical properties, the density and the chemical contraction occuring during the polymerisation for this new generation of epoxy resins.

Keywords

Large Hadron Collider Cryogenic Temperature Adhesive Joint Linear Shrinkage Cure Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Rey
    • 1
  • B. Gallet
    • 1
  • F. Kircher
    • 1
  • J. C. Lottin
    • 1
  1. 1.CEA, DSM/DAPNIA/Service Technique de Cryogénie et de MagnétismeGif-sur-YvetteFrance

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