The Tensile Properties of Polyimide Film at Cryogenic Temperatures and Radiation Effects On Polyimide Films

  • T. Tanaka
  • K. Hosoyama
  • K. Hara
  • T. Saito
  • S. Takabayashi
  • Y. Okamoto
  • Y. Toda
  • K. Nojima
  • M. Mori
  • H. Sunaga
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials book series (ACRE, volume 42)

Abstract

Polyimide films has been used as insulating component in superconducting machinery1. A full understanding of the property at low temperatures and the radiation effect is very important for stabilization of superconducting coils. The tensile properties of polyimide films have been measured at 4.2 K ~ 473 K. Stress-Strain curve profiles vary as a function of temperature. At cryogenic temperature, the elongation is much lower but the tensile strength is higher than that at room temperature. Also, polyimide film degradation performances after exposure of to an electron beam at very high dose level are examined. The test device for irradiation has a cooling system for preventing polyimide film from heating by electron absorption. The tests are performed at room temperature in He gas. After 80 MGy absorption, the elongation maintains about 60 % level of the non irradiated film, and the tensile strength maintains about 85 %.

Keywords

Tensile Property Retention Rate High Energy Physics Cryogenic Temperature Polyimide Film 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Tanaka
    • 1
  • K. Hosoyama
    • 2
  • K. Hara
    • 2
  • T. Saito
    • 3
  • S. Takabayashi
    • 4
  • Y. Okamoto
    • 5
  • Y. Toda
    • 6
  • K. Nojima
    • 6
  • M. Mori
    • 7
  • H. Sunaga
    • 8
  1. 1.Dupont-Toray Co., Ltd.Shinpocho, Tokai Aichi, 476Japan
  2. 2.National Laboratory for High Energy PhysicsIbaragi, 305Japan
  3. 3.Hitachi Works Hitachi Ltd.Japan
  4. 4.Ube Industries. Ltd.Japan
  5. 5.Kaneka CorporationJapan
  6. 6.Arisawa Mfg. Co., Ltd.Japan
  7. 7.Shinco Co., Ltd.Japan
  8. 8.Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Takasaki)Japan

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