Properties of Internal-Tin Nb3Sn Strand for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  • E. Gregory
  • E. Gulko
  • T. Pyon
  • L. F. Goodrich
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials book series (ACRE, volume 42)

Abstract

We report on the design and properties of a Nb3Sn wire strand developed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The internal-tin process was employed using 19 subelements, 6 spacers, and a Ta-containing barrier to separate the superconducting core from the Cu stabilizer. Specific values of the four properties — critical current density Jc, hysteresis losses, residual resistivity ratio RRR, and piece length — required by the ITER specification are difficult to achieve simultaneously in one strand design. This is particularly true when the strand is Cr plated to prevent sintering and to provide interstrand resistance. Some aspects of conductor design and heat treatment, and how these affect the various properties, including n value, are outlined.

Keywords

Critical Current Density Ramp Rate Hysteresis Loss International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor High Density Material 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Gregory
    • 1
  • E. Gulko
    • 1
  • T. Pyon
    • 1
  • L. F. Goodrich
    • 2
  1. 1.IGC Advanced SuperconductorsWaterburyUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyBoulderUSA

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