Elastic Properties of Composite Iter Insulation Systems

  • R. P. Reed
  • P. E. Fabian
  • T. S. Bauer-McDaniel
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials book series (ACRE, volume 42)

Abstract

Candidate composite insulation systems were tested at 295, 76, and 4 K to determine relevant elastic property data for design and analysis use in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Vacuum-pressure-impregnated, preimpregnated, and high-pressure laminate (G-11CR) resin systems were included. One system contained a polyimide-film electrical barrier. Tests focused on the through-thickness Young’s modulus, the interlaminar shear modulus, and the in-plane shear modulus. Subsize strain gages were used to obtain through-thickness strain measurements, and strain-gage rosettes, to measure shear strains.

Keywords

International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Insulation System Electrical Barrier Toroidal Field Coil DGEBA Epoxy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. P. Reed
    • 1
  • P. E. Fabian
    • 2
  • T. S. Bauer-McDaniel
    • 2
  1. 1.Cryogenic Materials, Inc.BoulderUSA
  2. 2.Composite Technology Development, Inc.BoulderUSA

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