Problems Involved in Determining the Mechanical Properties of Solid Nitrogen and a Composite of Solid Nitrogen and Aluminum Foam (40 K – 61 K)

  • R. C. Pederson
  • C. D. Miller
  • J. M. Arvidson
  • K. Blount
  • M. Schulze
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 44)

Abstract

Little data is available on the mechanical properties of solid nitrogen. This test effort was undertaken to provide input for structural modeling of the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS*) solid nitrogen dewar. Testing was performed for both solid nitrogen alone, and solid nitrogen in a matrix of 1.6% (by volume) density aluminum foam. The test measurements included the ultimate stress and modulus of elasticity under both compressive and tensile loading over a range of temperatures from 40 K to 61 K. The tests also sought to characterize the creep behavior of solid nitrogen, which was found to have a strong influence on the load-bearing capacity of the test samples. Two independent test efforts were carried out using different sample configurations and test apparatus to obtain the data. Data and supporting analysis is presented for each of the two test efforts. Similarities and differences between the data are discussed.

Keywords

Bulk Modulus Stress Relaxation Aluminum Foam Ultimate Tensile Stress Stress Relaxation Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. C. Pederson
    • 1
  • C. D. Miller
    • 1
  • J. M. Arvidson
    • 2
  • K. Blount
    • 2
  • M. Schulze
    • 2
  1. 1.Ball Aerospace Systems DivisionBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Materials Research & Engineering, Inc.BoulderUSA

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