Plasma Treatment of Composite Interface for Cryogenic Use

  • T. Yagi
  • S. Ueno
  • S. Nishijima
  • T. Okada
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 44)

Abstract

Surface treatment of polymeric films with electron cyclotron resonance plasma were carried out in order to introduce functional goups and/or to roughen the surface of polymeric films, aiming at improving adhesive properties at cryogenic temperature. Argon, nitrogen or oxygen plasma was produced for the treatment. Polyimide or polyethylene film were treated. Interface strengths between the film and epoxy at liquid nitrogen temperature were tested. It is found that the interface strength was improved markedly. The effect of plasma gas was found to be minor. Fourier transform-infrared transmission spectra of treated films was measured and the surface of treated films were also observed with scanning electron microscopy. Introduction of functional groups and roughening the surface were effective to improve the interface strength.

On the polyethylene the contact angle of water or glycerol were measured. The wettability of polyethylene surface with water was simulated in terms of molecule dynamics. The relationship between the fourier transform-infrared transmission spectra and the contact angle was discussed.

Keywords

Contact Angle Adhesive Strength Liquid Nitrogen Temperature Electron Cyclotron Resonance Interface Strength 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Yagi
    • 1
  • S. Ueno
    • 1
  • S. Nishijima
    • 1
  • T. Okada
    • 1
  1. 1.ISIR, Osaka UniversityIbaraki, Osaka 567Japan

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