Characterization of High-Current Nb3Sn Cable-in-Conduit Conductors VS Applied Sheath Strain

  • J. R. Miller
  • R. P. Walsh
  • M. R. Haslow
  • W. J. Kenney
  • G. E. Miller
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 44)

Abstract

The three superconducting subcoils for the 45-T Hybrid Magnet System now being assembled at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) all use Cable-InConduit Conductors (CICC); two of these contain strain-sensitive, multifilamentary Nb3Sn wires. With the extremely high peak fields in which the conductors for these coils must operate — nearly 17 T for one Nb3Sn coil and approximately 13 T for the other — it is essential to account for the total intrinsic filament strain resulting from the combination of differential contractions during cooldown from the reaction temperature and the hoop loading of conductors during energization of the magnet. We have examined this problem through tests of specially constructed model conductors, wherein the NHMFL split-solenoid was used to measure critical currents of over 10 kA, at fields up to 14 T, and with applied longitudinal loads up to 250 kN. We describe the results of these tests, the correlation of the full-scale CICC results with critical-current vs applied-strain measurements on single wires, and our projections of the operating margins expected for the Nb3Sn coils in the 45-T Hybrid.

Keywords

Critical Current Test Piece Deviatoric Strain Single Wire Composite Wire 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J.R. Miller et al., Teion Kogaku (Cryogenic Engineering — Japan), 31 (1996) 240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    J.R. Miller et al., Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, 41A (1996) 489.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    L.T. Summers et al., “Development of High-Strength Sensitization-Resistant Steels for use as the Conduit for Cable-in-Conduit Conductors”, High Magnetic Fields: Applications, Generation, Materials, H.-J. Schneider-Muntau, ed., World Scientific Press, Singapore, 1997, p. 511.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J.W. Ekin, Cryogenics, 20 (1980) 611.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    R.M. Scanlan et al., “Mechanical Properties of High-Current Multifilamentary Nb3Sn Superconductors,” Filamentary A-15 Superconductors, M. Sucnaga and A.F. Clark, eds., Plenum Press, New York and London, 1980, p. 221.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    M.M. Steeves and M.O. Hoenig, IEEE Trans. Magn., MAG-19 (1983) 374.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    J.R. Miller et al., IEEE Trans. Magn., MAG-23 (1987) 1547.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    W. Specking et al., “The effect of axial stress on of subsize NET Nb3Sn conductors,” Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Magnet Technology (MT-11), T. Sekingushi and S. Shimamoto, eds., Elsevier Applied Science, London and New York, 1990, p. 1009.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    L.T. Summers et al., IEEE Trans. on Appl. Superconductivity, 5 (1995) 1896.MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    L.T. Summers et al., IEEE Trans. Magn., MAG-27 (1991) 2041.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    J.W. Ekin, J. Appl. Phys., 62 (1987) 4829ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    B. ten Haken et al., IEEE Trans. Applied Superconductivity, 5 (1995) 1909.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Miller
    • 1
  • R. P. Walsh
    • 1
  • M. R. Haslow
    • 1
  • W. J. Kenney
    • 1
  • G. E. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.National High Magnetic Field LaboratoryTallahasseeUSA

Personalised recommendations