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On a Dislocation Crack-Tip Model in Cyclic Al-Li Alloy

  • Arie Bussiba
  • Yosef Katz
Part of the An International Cryogenic Materials Conference Publication book series (ACRE, volume 40)

Abstract

Within the framework of frequency effects observed during fatigue, the role of transients due to crack-tip deformation-rate transitions was investigated. To assist in sorting out the dominant variables, an Al-Li alloy was selected with emphasis on the frequency range 10−1 to 102 Hz at low temperatures.

The study found that the fatigue crack-tip extension rate increases as the frequency decreases, even without environmental effects. As such, the low-frequency domain becomes critical even in terms of a low-strain-rate-environment deformation test. Refinements of possible interactive processes give a better insight into the compatibility of passivation film removal and breakdown, hydrogen decohesion or induced localized plasticity for micro-cracking mechanisms. These are discussed for the fatigue-environment conditions of current experimental results in light of a crack-tip dislocation-interaction model.

Keywords

Fatigue Crack Dislocation Velocity Transient Zone Dislocation Group Cyclic Damage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arie Bussiba
    • 1
  • Yosef Katz
    • 1
  1. 1.Nuclear Research Center — NegevBeer-ShevaIsrael

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