Cyclic Strength and Fatigue Life of Base Metal and Welded Joints of Candidate Steels for ITER Applications

  • V. N. Maley
  • S. A. Voronin
  • R. V. Chvartatsky
  • S. V. Gavrilov
Part of the An International Cryogenic Materials Conference Publication book series (ACRE, volume 40)

Abstract

Candidate austenitic steels and welds for load-carrying structures of ITER superconducting magnet systems were studied. The cyclic strength and crack resistance of candidate materials cover a wide range and are determined by their chemical composition and the technology used in their manufacture. Cyclic strength (50 × 104 cycles base) and crack resistance data of 03Cr20Ni16Mn6N and 12Crl8Nil0Ti steels and their welds at 77 and 4.2 K are analyzed. Procedures used to improve the properties of base metal and welded joints are considered.

Keywords

Fatigue Crack Base Metal Fatigue Life Fatigue Strength Fatigue Crack Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. N. Maley
    • 1
  • S. A. Voronin
    • 1
  • R. V. Chvartatsky
    • 2
  • S. V. Gavrilov
    • 2
  1. 1.E. O. Paton Electric Welding InstituteKievUkraine
  2. 2.Efremov Research Institute of Electro-Physical ApparatusSt. PetersburgRussia

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