Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics for Cryogenic Use: Improvement of Thermal Contraction and Elastic Modulus in Thickness Direction

  • Shigehiro Nishijima
  • Kenichi Nojima
  • Kiyoshi Asano
  • Atsusi Nakahira
  • Toichi Okada
  • Koichi Niihara
Part of the An International Cryogenic Materials Conference Publication book series (ACRE, volume 40)

Abstract

The thermal contraction down to cryogenic temperatures and compressive modulus in thickness direction of laminates have been improved aiming at the practical application to the large scale superconducting magnets. The properties in thickness direction are usually inferior to those in in-plane direction because they are mainly controlled by the matrix of the composites. The improvement of the characteristics in the thickness direction was tried by means of either the use of filled matrix or the increase of volume fraction of glass fibers. Several kinds of fillers were evaluated changing the size, shape and distribution of size. The thermal and mechanical properties of the filled epoxies were examined to decide the desirable filled matrix. The volume fraction of glass fibers was also increased up to 65%. The compressive modulus and the thermal contraction of the improved GFRP in thickness direction was confirmed to show 0.3% and 18GPa, respectively.

Keywords

Compressive Strength Thickness Direction Filler Content Compressive Modulus Glass Fiber Reinforce Plastic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigehiro Nishijima
    • 1
  • Kenichi Nojima
    • 2
  • Kiyoshi Asano
    • 2
  • Atsusi Nakahira
    • 1
  • Toichi Okada
    • 1
  • Koichi Niihara
    • 1
  1. 1.ISIROsaka UniversityIbaraki Osaka 567Japan
  2. 2.Arisawa MFG Co.,Ltd.Joetsu, Niigata 943Japan

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