Effects of Regenerator Geometry on Pulse Tube Refrigerator Performance

  • M. Lewis
  • T. Kuriyama
  • J. H. Xiao
  • R. Radebaugh
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 43)

Abstract

This paper gives results of the cooling performance of a double-inlet pulse tube refrigerator using various regenerators. The same pulse tube was used for all the experiments and measured 4.76 mm in diameter and 46.2 mm in length. A commercial linear compressor with a swept volume of 4 cm3 was used in these experiments. The operating conditions were held constant at a mean pressure of 2.0 MPa and a frequency of 54 Hz. Using finite difference software called REGEN3.1, developed at MST, and recent experiment results, we optimized a series of regenerators based on dimensions, materials and screen packing. The values used for calculating the thermal conduction through stacked screens by REGEN3.1 were based on recent experimental results from MST. The regenerator tubes were designed using 316 stainless steel and titanium materials. The regenerator matrices investigated were 400-mesh and 500-mesh stainless steel screen. The valve settings for both orifices were adjusted to minimize the no-load temperature for all regenerators. A cooling capacity curve from 0 to 3 W was also determined. The performance of the pulse tube refrigerator using the different regenerators is discussed. The experimental results from the various regenerators are evaluated and compared with their corresponding numerically calculated coefficient of performance (COP) and regenerator design as determined by REGEN3.1.

Keywords

Pressure Ratio Pulse Tube Regenerator Tube Stainless Steel Screen Phosphor Bronze 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Lewis, M., Kuriyama, T., Kuriyama, F., and Radebaugh, R., “Measurement of Heat Conduction Through Stacked Screens,” presented at CEC Conference in Portland Oregon, 1997, to be published.Google Scholar
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    Gary, J., Daney, D.E., and Radebaugh, R., “A Computational Model for a Regenerator,” Proc. Third Cryocooler Conference, National Bureau of Standards(U.S.) Special Publication 698, (1985), p. 199.Google Scholar
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    Gary, J., and Radebaugh, R., “An Improved Numerical Model for Calculation of Regenerator Performance (REGEN3.1),” Proc. Fourth Interagency Meeting on Cryocoolers, David Taylor Research Center, Report DTRC-91/003, (1991), p. 165.Google Scholar
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    Yaron, R., Shokralla, S., Yuan, J., Bradley, P., and Radebaugh, R., “Etched Foil Regenerators,” Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol, 41, Part B, p. 1342–1346, Plenum Press, New York (1996).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Lewis
    • 1
  • T. Kuriyama
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. H. Xiao
    • 1
    • 3
  • R. Radebaugh
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Toshiba Co.KawasakiJapan
  3. 3.Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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