Ramp Rate Testing of an HTS High Gradient Magnetic Separation Magnet

  • M. A. Daugherty
  • E. W. Roth
  • D. E. Daney
  • D. D. Hill
  • F. C. Prenger
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 43)

Abstract

We report on the ramp rate testing of a prototype high temperature superconducting (HTS) high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) magnet. HGMS magnets asre ramped from full field to zero field to clean the separation matrix. The time spent ramping the magnet is unavailable for processing and must therefore be kept to a minimum. Existing commercial low temperature superconducting HGMS magnets are immersed in a liquid helium bath and are designed to ramp from zero to full current in one minute. The HTS magnet in our system is conductively cooled and operates in a vacuum at a temperature of approximately 30 K.

Heat generated during ramping is not as readily removed from the conductively cooled magnet as a bath cooled magnet. To verify that the conductive cooling can adequately remove heat generated during ramping we recorded magnet temperatures and voltages while ramping at rates of up to 4.8 A/second. The magnet can accommodate ramps from zero to 100 A (1.6 Tesla) in 21 seconds with no degradation in performance. The average magnet temperature rises a maximum of 1 K during ramping. Using temperatures recorded during ramps we have made rough estimates of the losses generated in the magnet.

Keywords

High Temperature Superconducting Ramp Rate Magnet Temperature Full Current High Gradient Magnetic Separation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Daugherty
    • 1
  • E. W. Roth
    • 1
  • D. E. Daney
    • 1
  • D. D. Hill
    • 1
  • F. C. Prenger
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

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