Pumping Performance of Cryopanels Coated with Activated Carbon

  • Chr. Day
  • B. Kammerer
  • A. Mack
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 43)

Abstract

Within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme, a cryopump system for ITER is being developed. The pumping characteristics of cryosorption panels coated with activated carbon are investigated under ITER relevant operating conditions. The underlying design of the panels described in this paper is generally accepted for the cryopump system of the ITER tokamak.

Quantitative vacuum pumping performance data are obtained by the measurement of pumping speed as a function of gas load and pumping pressure for various gases. We have investigated pure gas species (helium, protium and deuterium) and their mixtures. Our measurements have been performed to determine the major factors affecting cryopumping performance, such as flow rate, charcoal saturation, panel temperature and pressure during pumping. Selectivity of mixture pumping has been monitored by the use of a gas mass spectrometer. Dynamic loading effects due to the mobility of the molecules are also investigated. The results presented demonstrate the flexibility and assess the constraints of the recommended pump concept.

Keywords

International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Cryogenic Engineer Equilibration Break Panel Temperature Critical Mixture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chr. Day
    • 1
  • B. Kammerer
    • 1
  • A. Mack
    • 1
  1. 1.Forschungszentrum KarlsruheHauptabteilung IngenieurtechnikKarlsruheGermany

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