Cognition and Negative Affectivity

  • Vanessa L. Malcarne
  • Rick E. Ingram
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 16)

Abstract

Cognitive approaches to the conceptualization, empirical investigation, assessment, and treatment of behavioral dysfunction are both widespread and abundant (Ingram, Kendall, & Chen, 1991). Once considered a radical departure from empirical psychological science, the necessity of the “cognitive revolution” in clinical psychology currently only merits discussion from a historical standpoint (Ingram & Kendall, 1986). Now firmly acknowledged as a legitimate aspect of psychological science, cognitive perspectives assume that the fashion in which information is processed plays a significant role in the mediation of behavioral experience and contributes considerable variance to individual functioning.

Keywords

Negative Affectivity Anxiety Disorder Attributional Style Nonclinical Sample Tripartite Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vanessa L. Malcarne
    • 1
  • Rick E. Ingram
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA

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