Parent-Child Interaction Approaches to the Treatment of Child Behavior Problems

  • Rebecca Foote
  • Sheila Eyberg
  • Elena Schuhmann
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 20)

Abstract

Behavioral parent training, or parent management training (PMT), refers to procedures in which parents are trained to alter their child’s behavior at home (Kazdin, 1996). The recognition that parents can become effective agents of therapeutic change in their children has resulted in the development and empirical evaluation of numerous parent training programs. Today, PMT is considered the treatment of choice for child conduct problems (Azar & Wolfe, 1989; Kazdin, 1987) and is gaining popularity as a component in the treatment of child internalizing problems as well (Albano & Barlow, 1996; Brent et al., 1996; Kendall & Treadwell, 1996; Lewinsohn, Clark, Rohde, Hops, & Seeley, 1996; Stark, Swearer, Kurowski, Sommer, & Bowen, 1996).

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Parent Training Conduct Disorder Behavioral Parent Training Parent Management Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebecca Foote
    • 1
  • Sheila Eyberg
    • 1
  • Elena Schuhmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical and Health PsychologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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