Numerical Data on Viscosity

  • K. Stephan
  • K. Lucas

Abstract

The viscosity of air, considered here as a mixture of 21% oxygen, 78.1% nitrogen and 0.9% argon, is based on the experimental data of Lo et al. [133]. Their correlation was used to produce the recommended values presented on the next page. The values are plotted as isotherms against pressure in Figure 1, and as isobars against temperature in Figure 2.

Keywords

Numerical Data Capillary Tube Pressure Dependence Additional Work Critical Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Stephan
    • 1
  • K. Lucas
    • 2
  1. 1.University of StuttgartStuttgartFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Gesamthochschule DuisburgDuisburgFederal Republic of Germany

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