Integrated Navigation Systems

  • Tom Logsdon
Chapter

Abstract

In 1927, when Charles Lindbergh ventured out over the Atlantic aboard his beloved Spirit of St. Louis, he tracked his progress using dead reckoning positioning techniques. As accurately as he could, Lindbergh measured his ground speed along each leg of his 33-hour journey. Then he multiplied by the elapsed time to estimate his new position.

Keywords

Navigation System Inertial Navigation System Dead Reckoning Star Tracker Strapdown Inertial Navigation System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Tom Logsdon 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tom Logsdon

There are no affiliations available

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